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Book Recs: Amazing Romances & Books with Ace Representation

Hello friends! I hope all of you are well.¬†‚̧

Originally, I was going to do a whole book recommendation post on amazing and well-developed romances. But¬†then, while creating the post, I realized that I don’t¬†actually like that many romance books. As someone who falls under the ace (asexual)-spectrum, it was like the stars aligned in my mind: I only like romances that have a close friendship or strong emotional connection preceding the romance – it had never occurred to me before that.

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Diversity Spotlight Thursday #10

diversity-spotlight

Welcome to my tenth Diversity Spotlight Thursday! This wonderful weekly blog meme was created and is hosted by Aimal at Bookshelves and Paperbacks! For more information about the meme, please read the announcement post here.

My participation in this meme is to help me with one of my reading goals: to read books with a variety of perspectives, especially ones different from my own. Every two weeks I will share with you:

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

I wanted to do a theme for this week’s Diversity Spotlight – so this week’s theme is:¬†books with¬†bisexual protagonists!

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23

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #5

diversity-spotlight

Welcome to my fifth¬†Diversity Spotlight Thursday! ūüíö¬†This wonderful weekly blog meme was created and is hosted by Aimal at Bookshelves and Paperbacks! For more information about the meme, please read the announcement post here.

My participation in this meme is to help me with one of my reading goals: to read books with a variety of perspectives, especially ones different from my own. Every two weeks I will share with you:

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

This week’s theme for Diversity Spotlight Thursday is:¬†books with m/m romances!

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14

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

beauty-queens

When a plane crash strands thirteen teen beauty contestants on a mysterious island, they struggle to survive, to get along with one another, to combat the island’s other diabolical occupants, and to learn their dance numbers in case they are rescued in time for the competition. Written by Libba Bray, the hilarious, sensational, Printz Award-winning author of A Great and Terrible Beauty and Going Bovine. The result is a novel that will make you laugh, make you think, and make you never see beauty the same way again.

Beauty Queens¬†delighted me in every way possible. Brandishing dark comedy and satire, it elucidates and explores complex themes such as feminism, racism, ethnicity, identity, disabilities, gender, sexuality, prejudice, and social standards. That’s a¬†lot¬†of themes to explore, but Bray has done it fantastically. Paired with its plot – when a plane crashes on a remote island, thirteen beauty pageant contestants are the only survivors –¬†the result is an excellent¬†book that manages to be ridiculous¬†but also incredibly intelligent,¬†honest and genuine.

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42

Let’s Talk About: ‚ÄėIssues‚Äô Stories, Happy Stories & Why We Need Both

issues-and-happy

Earlier this month in October, T wrote a thread on Twitter about criticizing problematic portrayals that are ‘realistic’. The idea of today’s discussion post came to me after reading T’s tweets, and I felt compelled¬†to reflect on¬†my preference of books that tackle marginalized social identities.

In today’s¬†Let’s Talk About, I talk about¬†the importance of reading books that explore social issues, particularly those relating to¬†people of marginalized identities and what they may face and experience, as well as why it is important – in fact,¬†necessary¬†– to have happy stories too.

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Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee

notyoursidekick

Welcome to Andover‚Ķ where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated. Just ask high school nobody, Jessica Tran. Despite her heroic lineage, Jess is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef-up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship‚ÄĒonly it turns out to be for the town‚Äôs most heinous supervillain. On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, who Jess thinks may have a secret of her own. Then there‚Äôs the budding attraction to her fellow intern, the mysterious ‚ÄúM,‚ÄĚ who never seems to be in the same place as Abby. But what starts as a fun way to spite her superhero parents takes a sudden and dangerous turn when she uncovers a plot larger than heroes and villains altogether.

Let me introduce to you my new favourite book.

Not Your Sidekick is one remarkable, superpowered book. It has everything that I want in a book: it has superheroes and supervillains, a lovable Asian protagonist, gorgeous friendships, and heart-melting crushes. Though the pieces of Not Your Sidekick may sound familiar, Lee has crafted a beautifully cohesive story that puts a refreshing spin on the increasingly hackneyed superhero narrative. Needless to say, I was enthralled by this book.

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Let’s Talk About: My Problem With The Word ‘Diverse’

word diverse 2

I don’t think it needs to be said, but I’ll say it anyway: I’m pro-diversity, and there’s no buts about it. Heck, do you remember when I talked about why I¬†needed representation as a child and need it now as an adult? That still stands; nothing has changed. I still need representation.

However, the more I hear it, the more ‘off’ the word ‘diverse’ feels¬†to me.¬†I keep hearing how people want more ‘diverse’ characters, and how this book had a ‘diverse’ character which made the book awesome. I don’t doubt those opinions (on the contrary,¬†I am confident they are pure in intention) but it is strange seeing characters – representations of¬†people¬†– described as ‘diverse’.

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