14

The Chaos of Stars by Kiersten White

chaos of stars

Isadora’s family is seriously screwed up—which comes with the territory when you’re the human daughter of the ancient Egyptian gods Isis and Osiris. Isadora is tired of living with crazy relatives who think she’s only worthy of a passing glance—so when she gets the chance to move to California with her brother, she jumps on it. But her new life comes with plenty of its own dramatic—and dangerous—complications . . . and Isadora quickly learns there’s no such thing as a clean break from family.

Blending Ally Carter’s humor and the romance of Cynthia Hand’s Unearthly, The Chaos of Stars takes readers on an unforgettable journey halfway across the world and back, and proves there’s no place like home.

I discovered The Chaos of Stars when I stumbled upon one of its beautiful quotes. I remember reading it, and then promptly bursting into tears. This, dear friends, was the quote:

Continue reading

36

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

monster calls

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do.

But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming…

This monster is something different, though. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor.

It wants the truth.

Despite my undeniable love for A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, this is a book that is difficult to review. First, for its beautifully crafted story that is best read and experienced rather than explained, and second, because no matter my writing capabilities, I believe I could not do this book justice.

Continue reading

39

A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

adsom

Kell is one of the last Travelers—rare magicians who choose a parallel universe to visit.

Grey London is dirty, boring, lacks magic, ruled by mad King George. Red London is where life and magic are revered, and the Maresh Dynasty presides over a flourishing empire. White London is ruled by whoever has murdered their way to the throne. People fight to control magic, and the magic fights back, draining the city to its very bones. Once there was Black London—but no one speaks of that now.

Officially, Kell is the Red Traveler, personal ambassador and adopted Prince of Red London, carrying the monthly correspondences between royals of each London. Unofficially, Kell smuggles for those willing to pay for even a glimpse of a world they’ll never see. This dangerous hobby sets him up for accidental treason. Fleeing into Grey London, Kell runs afoul of Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She robs him, saves him from a dangerous enemy, then forces him to another world for her ‘proper adventure’.

But perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, Kell and Lila will first need to stay alive—trickier than they hoped.

A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab is such a delightful piece of storytelling. 

It is the rare book that seamlessly combines parallel universes with fantasy (a plus, since the former is more often located in science-fiction), and has all the thrills of fantastic worldbuilding, a protagonist who dons a coat with more than two sides, cross-dressing thieves, an extensive history steeped in violence, and deliciously dark magic.

Continue reading

67

Let’s Talk About: What I’d Love to See in NA Fiction

see in NA

When most of us think of New Adult fiction, it oftentimes means Young Adult fiction + sex. I mean, sex isn’t a bad thing. Sex in novels can be great, especially if it is a means to explore and examine individuality, sexuality, and self-growth. (And, you know, because they’re fun to read.) But what about everything else that happens in that uncertain age? Though your teenage years are important, formative, and certainly tumultuous, your years between 18 and 30 years old are just as transformative, uncertain, and filled with obstacles. Where are these books? (Am I looking in the wrong place?)

In today’s Let’s Talk About, I list the things I’d love to see more of in NA fiction. Most of the items in the list will be strongly based on personal experience and my own observations, but if you have any ideas of your own, don’t forget to share in the comments!  Continue reading

33

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

court of thorns

When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution for it. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she only knows about from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal, but Tamlin—one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world.

As she dwells on his estate, her feelings for Tamlin transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie and warning she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But an ancient, wicked shadow grows over the faerie lands, and Feyre must find a way to stop it… or doom Tamlin—and his world—forever.

Here I am again, the black sheep.

The hype for A Court of Thorns and Roses was inescapable. People loved this book left, right and center. Me? Now that a month has passed since reading it (and I can articulate my thoughts with more confidence and clarity), I’m not sure if I liked it. I liked certain elements and parts of it, but unfortunately I was not too fond of the story itself.

Continue reading

10

These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner

broken stars

Luxury spaceliner Icarus suddenly plummets from hyperspace into the nearest planet. Lilac LaRoux and Tarver Merendsen survive – alone. Lilac is the daughter of the richest man in the universe. Tarver comes from nothing, a cynical war hero. Both journey across the eerie deserted terrain for help. Everything changes when they uncover the truth.

The Starbound Trilogy: Three worlds. Three love stories. One enemy.

I went in reading These Broken Stars with an expectation: that it would be an epic adventure set in space. I love the feeling of being so small in an infinite universe. There’s something about it that fills me with awe and wonder. Based on this, it would seem that These Broken Stars had everything going for it, and reading its grand and profound book summary, I believed that I would adore These Broken Stars.

Continue reading